Now that we’ve gotten toys down to a manageable number, we still struggle with the flow of new toys into the house, especially at birthdays and Christmas. However, there is a neat trick that helps us stop new toys from completely taking over ours lives:

Limit toy storage to a confined space.

This is a fantastic tip from Clutterfree with Kids by Joshua Becker. When that specific, confined toy area fills up, that’s it. No more toys. If a new one arrives, an old, underused one should go.

Good Toy Spaces

Good confined spaces are closets, a toy box, one set of shelves, under a bed, or a couple of tubs. Ideally, this is somewhere that you can close off so you don’t have to look at the toys all the time.

Limit Toy Storage Space

Toy Box Storage

Our Toy Spaces

We’re still trying to find the right amount of toy storage space in our house. We’ve started by confining the toys we have to the corner in the living room, the living room bookshelf, the toy box, the guest bedroom and both girls’ closets. We found the corner is not confined enough because it’s hard to define where a corner begins and ends or when a corner is “filled up”. My goal is to eventually confine the toys even more to simply the toy box, one or two bookshelves and a couple of tubs in the girls’ closets. The tubs are for rotating the toys and the toy box/shelf are for the toys we play with every day.

Limit Toy Storage Space

This tip offers a few other nice side-effects beyond simply having a manageable amount of toys. It:

  1. Keeps the house cleaner.
  2. Allows you to easily experiment with finding the optimal volume of toys. For instance, if you confine the toys to four tubs in a closet, but you find that the kids only play with the toy-equivalent of two tubs you can de-own the extras and reduce your confined space.
  3. Helps you and your kids know when it’s time to do another round of purging. When the confined space feels cluttered or full, it’s time to de-own again.